Summer.


I know I have been neglecting the blog! We have had a very very busy summer to say the least.

We completed an addition to the freestall barns, allowing us to increase our number of milking cows. This will put us up to about 510 cows in the milking barns.

concrete work for free stall barn
free stall barn addition
Hanging lights and fans in the addition:

hanging lights and fans free stall barn

Cows trickling into the addition as the builders finish in the back ground.
IMAG0530
We also did some renovating to the existing free stall barns, ripping off the old tattered curtains to replace them with new curtains that allow more air flow.demoing old curtains free stall barn

Still waiting for the curtains to get here, but the sides of the barn look like this now:

renovating a curtain sidewall free stall barn
With more cows comes more calves!  So we also made a small addition to the maternity barn to make feeding calves easier.

IMAG0625

Built some calf fence:

high tinsel calf fence

And last major project for this year, we broke ground on a new dry cow/maternity barn.


Caterpillar dozer breaking ground
Got most of the fill hauled this week:

fill sand for free stall barn

This barn will be attached to our existing maternity barn (seen in the upper left hand side of the picture) and give our dry cows (cows that are not currently being milked) a more comfortable place to relax then they have now, as well as give more room to our cows that are soon to be calving.

Of course, we also have normal cropping operations to keep up at the same time!

Side dressing nitrogen on corn:
side dressing corn with apache sprayer
Nitrogen is one of the main nutrients that corn needs, “side dressing” corn allows us to get the nitrogen on as the corn is up taking it, lessening the chance of it leaching out of the soil and into our water ways.

Refilling the sprayer.  Notice the drops, the nitrogen sprays out of those drops below the canopy between the rows near the plants roots.
Tending an apache sprayer
We make 4 crops of hay each each summer.  That means every acre of hay is cut, merged, chopped, hauled and packed into a bunker 4 times each summer!

Cutting 4th crop:
cutting hay macdon swather

Zoie helping me cut hay:

IMAG0585

Merging 4th crop: (Merging puts several windrows together so that the chopper and trucks have less ground to cover)

merging hay white 2-135 h&S merger

View from the trucks when we are chopping.  A wireless camera on the spout of the chopper and a display in each truck allows you to see your truck as you are being filled.

chopping claas 900 into trucks cab cam
claas 900 chopping alfalfa into truckMy father in law came and drove truck for us during third crop, he thinks we are crazy for farming some of our hills:

claas 900 chopping into trucks in hillsCutting sorghum-sudan grass for heifer feed, while the neighbors dog catches mice:

dog catching mice sorghum sudan grass

We wrecked not one, but two complete set of knives for the chopper, that gets expensive!
wrecked knives on claas 900

 

Currently we are now getting the corn head all tuned up for corn silage, which will start in about a week or so.

claas 900 corn head tune up
We grow a little bit of wheat.  It is swathed, combined, then the straw is baled:

swathed wheat
john deere 9500 combining wheat
john deere 9500 unloading grain
case ih baling wheat straw
My Dad got some ducks and chickens.  I say he is now the “poultry manager”

IMAG0645

 

Some heifers we are keeping at the neighbors until we can get our dry cow barn done:

heifers

Well, sorry that i didn’t post much this summer, but now you are mostly caught up on our summer!  I will try to post more pictures of the fall harvest.

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About Will

Dairy Farmer
This entry was posted in Agronomy, Animals, Cute Farm Kids, General Information, Machinery, Things Only My Dad Would Do and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Summer.

  1. Anonymous says:

    for sure a busy summer! Mom

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